Francis Thompson: The Poppy

Vladislav Nagornov - Enfant - from lusile17.centerblog.net

Vladislav Nagornov – Enfant – from lusile17.centerblog.net

This well-known poem appeared in Thompson’s first volume Poems in 1893. It is dedicated to Monica, the eldest of the four Meynell daughters. It was probably written in 1891 when she was 11 years old. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

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Brooke Boothby: Elegy

Hans Zatzka - Girl with butterfly - from iamachild.wordpress.com

Hans Zatzka – Girl with butterfly – from iamachild.wordpress.com

In 1796, Brooke Boothby published Sorrows. Sacred to the Memory of Penelope, a collection of poems in memory of his deceased daughter Penelope. In two previous posts I transcribed 7 of the 24 sonnets it contains. Now I reproduce one of its two elegies. In this sad poem, Boothby longs to die and to have his body deposited by a friend into Penelope’s tomb, so that his ashes can mix with hers. Then, being rid of his body, he imagines his daughter greeting him in heaven, taking him by the hand and crowning him with a wreath of flowers. CONTINUE READING…

Aside

~The Sun~

Girl - from Wolf Publishing

Girl – from Wolf Publishing

Wolf Publishing organized a poetry contest around this image of a girl. Here is my favourite one, it is full of love. The other entries are not bad either.

[2016/02/25: This was a reblog from the WP site of Wolf Publishing, which was removed. The poem is lost.]

Childhood nostalgia in Ernest Dowson’s Praeterita

In his lifetime, Ernest Dowson published two volumes of poems, Verses and Decorations. Both are included in The Poems and Prose of Ernest Dowson published by Arthur Symons, available on the web as a Project Gutenberg Ebook; some of these poems are also found in the web page Selected Poems and Prose — Ernest Dowson of The New Formalist. Dowson kept in a drawer a booklet of poems written in his youth, which was published posthumously under the title Poésie Schublade (“drawer poetry” in a mix of French and German); these poems are not widely available on the web, and this is one reason for including some of them in Agapeta. However, they also shine with freshness and evoke nostalgia for childhood, two qualities partially lost in the more polished verses of his maturity. The poem Praeterita (Latin word for “gone” or “dead”) expresses Dowson’s longing for those cherished memories from childhood. CONTINUE READING…