John Sebastian: Younger Girl

Hugh Shirley Candyside – John Sebastian performing in concert in East Lansing, Michigan, August 1970 – from Wikimedia Commons

John Benson Sebastian is an American singer and songwriter born in 1944. In 1965 he formed the band The Lovin’ Spoonful, for which he sang and played the guitar, also he authored all their hit songs during that period. He left the band in 1968 to start a solo career that went on until now. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

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Aleister Crowley: L’éternel printemps

Todd Webb – LaSalle Street and Amsterdam Avenue, Harlem (1946) – Museum of the City of New York / Todd Webb Archive

Youth directly feel the truth of love and life by dancing and holding each other, while old people try to reach it by pondering. The poet says: roll back the wheel of time and rejoin youth. Yielding to the ecstasy of love and dance, all ages can be one with eternity. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Flavia

Noctivagant – from brabikate.blogspot.fr

The 8th poem of Rosa Mundi, and other love-songs tells us that the beauty, the kisses and caresses of the loved Italian girl will not last, in the same way as night must soon end with sunrise. There is no salvation in an afterlife, so we must enjoy the pleasures of earthly life without delay, thus live the bliss of the short love night. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

A poem by a reader

William-Adolphe Bouguereau – La pêche aux grenouilles (1882) – from Art Renewal Center

I have devoted four posts to poems written by readers, that is, people who liked my posts, commented on them, or subscribed to Agapeta. Today I will present only one such poem. The author is one of my earliest readers, and the poem appeared four years ago, so indeed I could have mentioned it much earlier, but better late than never. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

A Little Love-Letter, by Joseph Ashby-Sterry

Although Ashby-Sterry loved girls of various ages, he clearly stated his preference for 16-year-old ones, while he often called younger ones ‘pet’. Thus he did not love them in the same manner as older ones, and in some way he considered them as less intelligent beings. Indeed, he often presented them as little animals. For instance one poem in the collection Boudoir Ballads is titled “Little Chinchilla”, and it required me some effort to decide whether it is about a girl or a little furry animal, and finally I could settle for a girl by reading another poem in another collection, “January” in The Lazy Minstrel, where he writes “To Miss Chinchilla you confide, / How proud you are to be her guide;” another poem in the latter collection, “The Kitten”, explicitly compares a 10-year-old girl to a kitten. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…