Minou Drouet, le génie écrasé de l’enfance

Roger Hauert - Minou Drouet (ca.1956) - from Cabinet n° 40 (2010/11)

Roger Hauert – Minou Drouet (ca.1956) – from Cabinet n° 40 (2010/11)

Enfant intelligente et extrêmement sensible, esprit libre et immensément créatif, Minou Drouet irritait de nombreux adultes. Plusieurs crièrent à l’imposture, affirmant qu’elle ne pouvait en aucun cas être l’auteur des poèmes et lettres publiés sous son nom. Certains la considéraient comme un monstre ou un animal de cirque. D’autres essayaient d’en faire une petite fille normale ou un poète comme les autres. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Concerning Hilda Conkling

Artist unknown - Hilda Conkling (1920) - from Poems By a Little Girl (via Cadbury Research Library)

Artist unknown – Hilda Conkling (1920) – from Poems By a Little Girl (via Cadbury Research Library)

As a little girl, Hilda Conkling recited poems to her mother, Grace Hazard Conkling, who wrote them down. Grace would then, apparently without telling Hilda, publish some of them in journals and periodials, in particular in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse. In the issue of September the 1st, 1919, there is an interesting correspondence about Hilda, then approaching her 9th birthday, her writing and her talent. CONTINUE READING…

William Blake: A Little Girl Lost

Frantisek Kupka - The little girl with a ball (1908) - from Painting of the Day by Hugo Martel

František Kupka – The little girl with a ball (1908) – from Painting of the Day by Hugo Martel (www.astro.phy.ulaval.ca)

The visionary poet and painter William Blake (b. 28 November 1757, d. 12 August 1827) went largely unrecognised during his lifetime, but he is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. In the poem A Little Girl Lost, published in Songs of Experience (1794), he envisages a future where children and adolescents will freely enjoy nudity and love, and the religious condemnation of these pleasures will cause indignation. He would have been dismayed to notice that 220 years after publishing that poem, things have not much progressed in the Anglo-Saxon world. CONTINUE READING…