Nathalia Crane at twelve

Nathalia Crane (c.1925) – from Wikimedia Commons

In 1925, Nathalia Crane published her second volume of poetry, Lava Lane, and Other Poems, just one year after her first one, The Janitor’s boy, and Other Poems. In it she airs her sophistication, mastering poetical language, as well as scientific and technical vocabulary from several disciplines, such as botany, geology and even embryology (using the word “blastoderm” about a boy she seems to despise); she also refers to various religions and to characters from Greek mythology. Furthermore, she shows her understanding of human relations, including in some of their intimate aspects. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

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Nathalia Crane: Jealousy

Chinese schoolchildren give a demonstration of their military skills in Hanking, where lessons include pre-military exercises using wooden weapons. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images, 1st April 1974)

In this humorous little piece, Nathalia imagines organizing a brigade of little girls in charge of watching their fathers and preventing their seduction by beautiful young women. Here Flatbush is a neighbourhood of Brooklyn in New York City. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Nathalia Crane, love and poetry at nine

Nathalia Crane (1924) – from The Janitor’s Boy, and Other Poems, via Wikimedia Commons

I will present here another girl poet who, like her contemporaries Hilda Conkling and Sabine Sicaud and the next generation’s Minou Drouet, started writing poetry at a very young age. But unlike Hilda Conkling and Minou Drouet, she did not give up poetry in her teenage years, and unlike Sabine Sicaud who died from a horrible disease at age 15, she lived for 85 years, writing poetry and novels, also working as a professor of English at San Diego State University. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Edgar Allan Poe: The Village Street

Vincent van Gogh – Girl in White in the Woods (1882) – from WikiArt.org

This poem is attributed to Poe, however it does not appear in the list given by The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, so a doubt remains about its authorship.

It tells about an encounter with a maid, raising the bright hope of love, followed quicky by disappointment. It is organized in twelve stanzas of six verses each, the last six stanzas echo in a negative way the first six ones: CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Boötes

Image 66458/2 from boombob.ru

Today Agapeta exists since two years and a half. The readership is steadily growing: nearly ten thousand views in 2015, a little more than twenty thousand in 2016, then more than fourteen thousand in the first six months of 2017 (fifteen thousand on July the 5th). The number of subscribers increases with regularity. Several blogs have included Agapeta in their blogroll, and many communications on various boards link to its posts. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Minou Drouet: The pillar-box’s song

Fernand Le Quesne – The Pillar Box, A Letter to Daddy (1917) – from toproschool.blogspot.fr

Readers who do not understand French may have been frustrated by the great number of posts about Minou Drouet, all written in that language, and looking quite informative. Now I have written a long article on Minou’s life in Pigtails in Paint, entitled “Minou Drouet: A Forgotten Child Poet.” It contains many details unknown to the general public. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…