Edgar Allan Poe: The Village Street

Vincent van Gogh – Girl in White in the Woods (1882) – from WikiArt.org

This poem is attributed to Poe, however it does not appear in the list given by The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, so a doubt remains about its authorship.

It tells about an encounter with a maid, raising the bright hope of love, followed quicky by disappointment. It is organized in twelve stanzas of six verses each, the last six stanzas echo in a negative way the first six ones: CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Boötes

Image 66458/2 from boombob.ru

Today Agapeta exists since two years and a half. The readership is steadily growing: nearly ten thousand views in 2015, a little more than twenty thousand in 2016, then more than fourteen thousand in the first six months of 2017 (fifteen thousand on July the 5th). The number of subscribers increases with regularity. Several blogs have included Agapeta in their blogroll, and many communications on various boards link to its posts. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Minou Drouet: The pillar-box’s song

Fernand Le Quesne – The Pillar Box, A Letter to Daddy (1917) – from toproschool.blogspot.fr

Readers who do not understand French may have been frustrated by the great number of posts about Minou Drouet, all written in that language, and looking quite informative. Now I have written a long article on Minou’s life in Pigtails in Paint, entitled “Minou Drouet: A Forgotten Child Poet.” It contains many details unknown to the general public. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

George Gordon Byron: To Ianthe

Drawn by R. Westall and engraved by W. Finden – Lady Charlotte Harley as Ianthe (1833) – from Wikimedia Commons

Lord Byron’s long poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage was published between 1812 and 1818, the first two Cantos in 1812, the third in 1816 and the fourth in 1818, and each edition added some new material. The seventh edition appeared on February 1, 1814, with nine poems added to the twenty already published, and a poem titled “To Ianthe” was prefixed to the First Canto. Written in the autumn of 1812, it was dedicated to Lady Charlotte Harley. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Edgar Allan Poe: May Queen Ode

Children doing maypole dancing in the Canungra Showgrounds (ca. 1934) – State Library of Queensland

About April 1836, Harriet Virginia Scott, a schoolgirl in Richmond, asked Edgar Allan Poe to compose a poem for her to recite to the Queen of May. He complied by writing four or five stanzas. About eighty years later (between 1911 and 1917), she remembered one of them and sent it to J. H. Whitty, who published it in the second edition of Complete Poems (1917). CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: The May Queen

Children maypole dancing (1900–1910) – State Library of Queensland

Before being devoted to the labour movement, May Day was an old Celtic celebration of spring and fertility, Beltane; throughout the centuries it evolved, with the maypole dancing by girls and the election of the May Queen, but it kept its hidden symbolism of youthful love. Crowley’s poem gives it back its ancient pagan meaning. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aside

Poetry by readers, 3rd set

Pierre-Auguste Renoir – Jeunes filles lisant (1890-1891) – Los Angeles County Museum of Art (collections.lacma.org)

This is my third post presenting poems published on WordPress blogs by my readers, in other words users who made themselves known to me by following Agapeta, by liking its posts, or commenting them. Indeed, I always have a look at the blog of anyone who follows Agapeta, likes a post, or writes a comment. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…