Moon 237

Doug Fitzgerald – Blue Moon I (1979) – from fitzgeraldspub.blogspot.fr

Agapeta now exists since three years and a half, and this is its 285th post. Some readers seem to have disappeared, even if they still remain listed as “followers”, while new ones have arrived. Trolls seem to become discouraged, I was never impressed by their insults and threats.

Since April 2017, the posting frequency has been one article every 5 days. From now on it will slow down a little, to one every 6 days. Indeed, my main problem is to find new contents, in particular relevant authors and musicians, and I do not get many suggestions from readers. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Advertisements

Aleister Crowley: L’éternel printemps

Todd Webb – LaSalle Street and Amsterdam Avenue, Harlem (1946) – Museum of the City of New York / Todd Webb Archive

Youth directly feel the truth of love and life by dancing and holding each other, while old people try to reach it by pondering. The poet says: roll back the wheel of time and rejoin youth. Yielding to the ecstasy of love and dance, all ages can be one with eternity. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Flavia

Noctivagant – from brabikate.blogspot.fr

The 8th poem of Rosa Mundi, and other love-songs tells us that the beauty, the kisses and caresses of the loved Italian girl will not last, in the same way as night must soon end with sunrise. There is no salvation in an afterlife, so we must enjoy the pleasures of earthly life without delay, thus live the bliss of the short love night. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Annie

Léon Perrault – Little girl with a bouquet of flowers (1896)

Rosa Mundi, and other love-songs is a collection of 28 numbered poems, first published in 1905. It starts with a very long poem, itself called “Rosa Mundi”. Poems numbered 4 to 13 are titled by names of girls. The most charming is the fourth, where a boy secretly offers three flowers to a girl, but in return she has only one secret flower to offer him. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Asmodel

Sulamith Wülfing – Flower (1931) – from Pigtails in Paint

This is a beautiful and strange poem about a loved girl who seems to come from an outer world, maybe from dreams, or from a star, a spiritual bride descending on the bed of the desiring poet, and their mystical union mixes extasy with agony. Both erotic and esoteric, full of hidden meanings, these verses are difficult to interpret. The 1905 edition of the poem states that the title means: One of the “Intelligences” of the Planet Venus. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

After 3 years

Dick Whittington – Dancing pupils, Southern California (1926) – from historyinphotos.blogspot.fr

Today marks the third anniversary of Agapeta. The blog attracts an ever increasing number of visitors, views, comments and likes. It becomes cited in many blogs or bulletin boards. It also attracts trolls who become more openly hateful, either religious bigots, or of the homophobic, racist and antisemitic type, sometimes threatening me with violence or claiming to “report” me for horrible crimes that I am supposed to have committed, or finally the funniest trolls, crazy paranoid people obsessed with conspiracies hidden behind “satanic” metal music (in particular the band NecroPedoSadoMaso). CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Ode to Sappho

William-Adolphe Bouguereau – Câlinerie (1890) – from Wikimedia Commons

Crowley’s collection Oracles, subtitled The Biography of an Art, consists of unpublished poems dating from 1886 to 1903. Two of them seem to extol womanly love, and the first one is devoted to the famous ancient Greek poetess from the island of Lesbos, who is reputed to have loved young girls. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…