Aleister Crowley: Asmodel

Sulamith Wülfing – Flower (1931) – from Pigtails in Paint

This is a beautiful and strange poem about a loved girl who seems to come from an outer world, maybe from dreams, or from a star, a spiritual bride descending on the bed of the desiring poet, and their mystical union mixes extasy with agony. Both erotic and esoteric, full of hidden meanings, these verses are difficult to interpret. The 1905 edition of the poem states that the title means: One of the “Intelligences” of the Planet Venus. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

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After 3 years

Dick Whittington – Dancing pupils, Southern California (1926) – from historyinphotos.blogspot.fr

Today marks the third anniversary of Agapeta. The blog attracts an ever increasing number of visitors, views, comments and likes. It becomes cited in many blogs or bulletin boards. It also attracts trolls who become more openly hateful, either religious bigots, or of the homophobic, racist and antisemitic type, sometimes threatening me with violence or claiming to “report” me for horrible crimes that I am supposed to have committed, or finally the funniest trolls, crazy paranoid people obsessed with conspiracies hidden behind “satanic” metal music (in particular the band NecroPedoSadoMaso). CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: Ode to Sappho

William-Adolphe Bouguereau – Câlinerie (1890) – from Wikimedia Commons

Crowley’s collection Oracles, subtitled The Biography of an Art, consists of unpublished poems dating from 1886 to 1903. Two of them seem to extol womanly love, and the first one is devoted to the famous ancient Greek poetess from the island of Lesbos, who is reputed to have loved young girls. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Aleister Crowley: The May Queen

Children maypole dancing (1900–1910) – State Library of Queensland

Before being devoted to the labour movement, May Day was an old Celtic celebration of spring and fertility, Beltane; throughout the centuries it evolved, with the maypole dancing by girls and the election of the May Queen, but it kept its hidden symbolism of youthful love. Crowley’s poem gives it back its ancient pagan meaning. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…