Charles Baudelaire : Le beau navire

William Stott of Oldham – Wild Flower (1881)

En août 1847, Baudelaire eut une liaison avec Marie Daubrun, née en 1827 sous le nom de Marie Bruneau. Plusieurs poèmes de son recueil Les Fleurs du mal lui sont consacrés, dont celui-ci, où il la décrit comme une jeune adolescente, à la fois enfant et femme. On notera que les trois premières strophes sont répétées dans les quatrième, septième et dixième.

Le beau navire

Je veux te raconter, ô molle enchanteresse !
Les diverses beautés qui parent ta jeunesse ;
Je veux te peindre ta beauté,
Où l’enfance s’allie à la maturité.

Quand tu vas balayant l’air de ta jupe large,
Tu fais l’effet d’un beau vaisseau qui prend le large,
Chargé de toile, et va roulant
Suivant un rhythme doux, et paresseux, et lent.

Sur ton cou large et rond, sur tes épaules grasses,
Ta tête se pavane avec d’étranges grâces ;
D’un air placide et triomphant
Tu passes ton chemin, majestueuse enfant.

Je veux te raconter, ô molle enchanteresse !
Les diverses beautés qui parent ta jeunesse ;
Je veux te peindre ta beauté,
Où l’enfance s’allie à la maturité.

Ta gorge qui s’avance et qui pousse la moire,
Ta gorge triomphante est une belle armoire
Dont les panneaux bombés et clairs
Comme les boucliers accrochent des éclairs ;

Boucliers provoquants, armés de pointes roses !
Armoire à doux secrets, pleine de bonnes choses,
De vins, de parfums, de liqueurs
Qui feraient délirer les cerveaux et les cœurs !

Quand tu vas balayant l’air de ta jupe large,
Tu fais l’effet d’un beau vaisseau qui prend le large,
Chargé de toile, et va roulant
Suivant un rhythme doux, et paresseux, et lent.

Tes nobles jambes, sous les volants qu’elles chassent,
Tourmentent les désirs obscurs et les agacent,
Comme deux sorcières qui font
Tourner un philtre noir dans un vase profond.

Tes bras, qui se joueraient des précoces hercules,
Sont des boas luisants les solides émules,
Faits pour serrer obstinément,
Comme pour l’imprimer dans ton cœur, ton amant.

Sur ton cou large et rond, sur tes épaules grasses,
Ta tête se pavane avec d’étranges grâces ;
D’un air placide et triomphant
Tu passes ton chemin, majestueuse enfant.

Source du poème : Les Fleurs du mal, 2e édition (1861).

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Charles Baudelaire : Le beau navire

  1. Hi, I have some more information about this William Stott painting – Wild Flower, using an unknown model – I don’t speak French so apologies if I’m repeating things! It’s from an exhibition catalogue – Here’s part of what’s said – “The title Wild flower may symbolise childish wilfulness, while the first part of this entry clearly alludes to Whistler’s The White Girl of 1862: indeed the lack of narrative in Wild Flower, together with the models unbound auburn hair and inscrutable expression, not to mention the white background, rug and fallen petals all suggest a conscious appropriation of Whistler’s iconography. However the theme of tainted innocence subtly implied in the White Girl is treated with much greater daring in Stott’s image, with its startling juxtaposition of vulnerable exposed flesh against soft fur offset by brittle roses.

    Like

    • You are referring to “Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl” by James Abbott McNeill Whistler. If you have the French text from the catalogue, you can give it here, or you can scan the catalogue and send the scan by email at my address given at the bottom of the page. I will then translate it in English.

      Like

  2. SeXquisite, as ever, Chris.

    Including so ‘appropriate’ Francophile Anglo Oldham Bill Stott’s ‘Sauvage Fleur’.

    Sooo, fer all arrogant, ignorant, AngloVILE ASSHOLES here’s moi translation.

    In August 1847, Baudelaire had an affair with Marie Daubrun, born in 1827 under the name of Marie Bruneau. Several poems of his collection Les Fleurs du mal are devoted to her, including this one, where he describes her as a young adolescent, both child and woman. It will be noted that the first three stanzas are repeated in the fourth, seventh and tenth.
    The beautiful ship
    I want to tell you, O soft enchantress!
    The various beauties which bind your youth;
    I want to paint your beauty,
    Where childhood allies itself to maturity.
    When you sweep the air of your wide skirt,
    You make the effect of a beautiful vessel that takes off,
    Loaded canvas, and rolling
    Following a gentle, lazy, and slow rhythm.
    On your wide, round neck, on your fat shoulders,
    Your head struts with strange graces;
    With a placid and triumphant air
    You pass your way, majestic child.
    I want to tell you, O soft enchantress!
    The various beauties which bind your youth;
    I want to paint your beauty,
    Where childhood allies itself to maturity.
    Your throat advancing and pushing the moire,
    Your triumphant throat is a beautiful closet
    Including curved and clear panels
    As the shields hang lightning;
    Shields provoking, armed with pink tips!
    Cabinet with soft secrets, full of good things,
    Wines, perfumes, liqueurs
    That would make the brains and the hearts delirious!
    When you sweep the air of your wide skirt,
    You make the effect of a beautiful vessel that takes off,
    Loaded canvas, and rolling
    Following a gentle, lazy, and slow rhythm.
    Your noble legs, under the ruffles they hunt,
    Tormenting obscure desires and annoying them,
    Like two witches who
    Turn a black philter into a deep vase.
    Your arms, which would play the precocious hercules,
    Are shining boas the solid emulators,
    Made to stubbornly clench,
    Like to print it in your heart, your lover.
    On your wide, round neck, on your fat shoulders,
    Your head struts with strange graces;
    With a placid and triumphant air
    You pass your way, majestic child.
    Source of the poem: Les Fleurs du mal, 2nd edition (1861).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Stott_(artist)

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s